Dylan Thomas 100. Highlights in Swansea include John Metcalf’s Under Milk Wood: An Opera at Taliesin Arts Centre (3 to 5 April), Lighthouse Theatre’s promenade performances of Return Journey (weekends, May to September), the world premiere of composer Karl Jenkins’ Three Images from Dylan Thomas with the Russian Philharmonic Orchestra at the Brangwyn Hall (18 October) as part of the annual Swansea Festival of Music and the Arts">

Dylan Thomas 100

On 27 October 1914 a son was born to David ‘DJ’ Thomas, a teacher, and his wife, Florence, a seamstress, in the front bedroom of their home at 5 Cwmdonkin Drive in the affluent Uplands area of Swansea. The boy, Dylan Marlais Thomas, went on to become one of the greatest (and most controversial) poets of the 20th century and his work, which included the poem Do Not Go Gentle and the ‘play for voices’ Under Milk Wood, will be celebrated with a year-long festival of events – Dylan Thomas 100 – in Wales, England and the USA in 2014.

 

Highlights in Swansea include John Metcalf’s Under Milk Wood: An Opera at Taliesin Arts Centre (3 to 5 April), Lighthouse Theatre’s promenade performances of Return Journey (weekends, May to September), the world premiere of composer Karl Jenkins’ Three Images from Dylan Thomas with the Russian Philharmonic Orchestra at the Brangwyn Hall (18 October) as part of the annual Swansea Festival of Music and the Arts, and Michael Bogdanov’s adaptation of A Child’s Christmas in Wales at the Grand Theatre (4 to 8 November).

 

Literature Wales, which promotes Welsh and English-language literature in Wales, has organised a series of literary tours, A Dylan Odyssey, between May and September including four taking place in Swansea and four further west in Laugharne, where Dylan lived at The Boathouse with his family from 1949 until his unexpected death at the age of 39 in New York in 1953.

 

Tour leaders include Hannah Ellis, Dylan’s granddaughter; Jeff Towns, one of the world’s leading Dylan Thomas experts; and author and scriptwriter Andrew Davies who has penned a new BBC drama, A Poet in New York. Also in Laugharne, there will be four ‘Dylan Weekends’ starting with the annual Laugharne Weekend literature festival from 4 to 6 April.

 

Dylan ThomasIf you want to find out more about Dylan, who was probably better known for his drinking and womanising than for his writing, the best place to start is at his childhood home at 5 Cwmdonkin Drive (the area, Uplands, is now known as Swansea’s ‘Notting Hill’). The house has been restored to its Edwardian origins and open to the public since 2008; the owners now offers guided tours, host music and literary events and organise Edwardian-themed dinners. Just opposite is Cwmdonkin Park, a pleasant place for a stroll, which provided the inspiration for the poem The Hunchback in the Park; information panels will tell you what to look out for.

 

Head back into town, stopping for a drink in the No Sign Bar on Wind Street, one of Dylan’s favourite watering holes when he was a cub reporter on the South Wales Daily Post whose office was nearby, before visiting the Dylan Thomas Centre, based in the city’s grand 19th-century former town hall, at the mouth of the River Tawe; this is home to the world’s largest collection of Dylan Thomas memorabilia and hosts the annual Dylan Thomas Festival in October.

 

For further information about Dylan Thomas 100 see:

 

Click here to view full time table

www.dylanthomas100.org
www.dylanthomas.com
www.literaturewales.org 
www.5cwmdonkindrive.com

 

Source & Credit: visitswanseabay.com